BHS

Class of `54

Chat `17

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From Kathleen (Hennesy) Stoll
June 30, 2017
Just returned from three weeks at Martha's Vineyard. Spent a lot of time sitting on the porch, watching the boats go in and out, and reading a wonderful book by David McCullough: 'The American Spirit." It is a collection of speeches he has given, mostly at commencements, with interesting stories of history. 

The fishing for striped bass was better than it has been for years, so the men spent a lot of time trying to catch 28 inch "keepers." Lobster rolls and fried scallops were our favorite foods--along with some clam chowder. Great to be in New England, with our grandson driving us to and from. but stuck in Ohio for the rest of the year. 
Thanks for all the news!

From Steve Wasby (teacher’s quote)
June 30, 2017
Mrs. Howarth (10th grade Biology):  “Message to Garcia~”   (But don’t ask me to remember what the message was.)


From Fred Merk  (teachers' quotes)
June 30, 2017
Hello Joe and Nancy.

The 2 impressive sayings I remember were from Mr Myers and Mr. Libby.

Before start of a history test Mr. Myers would say, "OK....let's see whatcha know!"....

Mr Libby would sometimes unexpectedly call on students in physics to answer questions based what we were learning.
If a student was vague or incorrect he would interrupt and say, "For the hole you are digging..... use shovel #9 with sideflaps!"

Just to let everyone know....Elizabeth and I are moving to Groton MA in August. This is all part of downsizing.
It is 8 miles from my cottage on Lake Massapoag in Tyngsboro and closer to Elizabeth's and my sons who live nearby in NH.
I am in the process of discarding lifelong "treasures"....This is not a trash barrel story....it's a dumpster story!

From John Keane
June 28, 2017
Joe,

I do recall Mrs. Hornsey promoting correct spelling by  saying ....."stationary.....E R paper".

Whenever I've had to write those words over the years she comes to mind appreciatively.

Happy Fourth.

From Harley Anderson
June 26, 2017
Thanks Joe,
We had Miss Bunting as the part time music teacher at the Butler School along with Mr. Plummer teaching art.

 Many years after graduation I saw Bill Cowing (Chemistry ) and Mr. Plummer at the Lexington Arts Center doing their thing.  Both were great guys. Last year I spoke with the son of Norm Brule (Art) to catch up on his history.

 How about pictures of us at very young ages and homes of distinction.?

I  also recall Mr. Brayton and Miss Clark from our Junior High days.   Music was understandable  in those days.  I cannot take much of the new sounds..   Drink plenty of water to help with the balance issue.

From Joe Mazzei
June 25, 2017
Now that Janet said that she meant a part time music teacher, and Rob Yacubian recalls Miss Bunting, I’m reminded of one of Miss Bunting’s puns. During the winter she would say (occasionally), “If you don’t C sharp, you’ll B flat”. Strange how some things stay with us forever.

From Janet Miller McKee
June 24, 2017
That question should read part time music teacher.   Janet currently in Connecticut for a week

From Rob Yacubian
June 23, 2017
Sorry I don't know the part time teacher but don't forget miss Bunting for music.

I had intended to come to the luncheon but fell and broke my hand and fractured my hip so I can't drive because of the hand. I'm recuperating at my older sister's in Cotuit on Cape Cod.

From Rod McElroy
June 23, 2017
My recollection is that Mr. Plummer was the elementary school art teacher.  And I certainly remember Miss Kohler worrying about our posture and making us hang from the horizontal bar located just out of "toe reach" from the floor (new phrase?) of terrified elementary school youngsters.

From Robert Picariello
June 23, 2017
I remember Mr. Plummer teaching penmanship, but not art in Payson Park. I don't believe we had an art teacher.

From Janet (Miller) McKee
June 17, 2017
Hello Joe - I have a question.  I can remember Miss Kohler, the "traveling" gym teacher, Mr. Plummer the art teacher, but was there a part time art
teacher in elementary school?

From Rob Yacubian
May 29, 2017
So glad to hear that Marjorie Whiting Ahlin is also a "true Belmontian" having been born on Wilson Ave. ( her mother never could remember my nickname and called me Zaggy)

From Ward Elliott
May 29, 2017
I’ve enjoyed the reminiscences of the Class of ’54, suspect that the Belmont Historical Society might love to have them in its records, and wonder whether other BHS classes might have comparable troves of coveted local lore.  Belmont’s history is surprisingly short and it looks less well recorded than my current  home town of Claremont, California, whose first Yankee settler, Tooch Martin, arrived in 1871, followed by the future-bringing railroad in 1877 and years of rapid subsequent development.  My guess is that the Historical Society would be surprised to find that Joe and Nancy’s chat records exist and that they want to get their hands on them for posterity while Joe and Nancy are still around to ask. Ditto for any other classes lucky enough to be as well curated as Joe’s.   I bet there is also a college or two in Greater Boston with ongoing oral history programs which don’t include either Belmont or high-school alumni chat rooms, but might jump at the chance to get some mileage out of ours.  Wonder when Belmont got its first black resident?  Not in our time, I would guess. About the time the Red Sox got their first black player, Pumpsie Green (1959), maybe?  Probably long after the Braves got Sam Jethroe, 1950.  Data wonks might like a look at City-Data stats on Belmont, http://www.city-data.com/city/Belmont-Massachusetts.html.  It’s full of great stats.
Best,
(
I’ll lask the Belmont Historical Society if they may be interested in what’s posted on our humble web site — JM)

 

From Mona (McLellan) Colthorpe
May 28, 2017
Being born in Belmont: my parents lived in Belmont shortly after they were married in 1929 first on Leslie Rd. Then Upland Rd. My brother was born in 1932 but mom was very modern and he was born at Mt. Auburn Hospital and so was I in 1937. Years later I was secretary to the Chief of Radiology at the Mt. Auburn Hospital, Dr. Richard Schatzki who also lived in Belmont

Mona McLellan Calthorpe

From John Keane
May 28, 2017
Hi Joe,
I have no interesting teacher stories to pass on to everyone, but have enjoyed reading what has been coming in. However, given all the world wide negative news I have trended to some peaceful and quiet scenes away from it all. Here's wishing peace to all our classmates.

From Marge (Whiting) Ahlin
May 27, 2017
I am not too handy with a computer, but please let Rob Yacubian know I was born on Wilson Ave. in Belmont ll/24/35.

One of these days I shall join in chatting. Best to all-

From Kathleen (Hennesy) Stoll
May 25, 2017
Kennedy was my commencement speaker in college, and I have a cup with one of my favorite quotes or his  which I thought the class might enjoy. 

JOHN F. KENNEDY—100TH BIRTHDAY, MAY 2017.

“There are three things in life which are real:
God, Human Folly, and Laughter.
The first two are beyond our comprehension.
So we must do what we can with the third.”

John F. Kennedy.   

Enjoy! We go to Martha's Vineyard nest week to go fishing and visit family.

From John Havice
May 23, 2017
Hi Joe,

Thought that you would like to see the changes coming to Cushing Square. The name of the project has recently been changed from "Cushing Village" to "The Bradford". I personally prefer the original name. The "Winslow" will be the first building and is expected to go up next summer.

Go to this website to see what is planned: http://cushingsquare.com/new-cushing-village.shtml

When you bring up the website look part way down the first page and you will see a bar with "1 of 44", a double pointed arrow and a box with "in" inside. To enlarge the pictures first click on the arrow and then click on the box.

You may also be interested in visiting the main website: http://cushingsquare.com

From Rob Yacubian
May 22, 2017
1 .A few years ago I think you asked if anyone else was born at home in Belmont, and therefore was a true Belmontian,  and one female answered positively.  I cant remember who that was.

2. Mrs. Hornsey taught us the “thirty days hath September....” and “the I before e.....” principle that has stayed with me since 1953.

From Marion (Schmitt) Ellis
May 14, (May 18), 2017
Hi Joe -- the stories of our homes in Belmont is a great thread.  Thanks to Janet for starting it all.  

My father was from St. Louis (where I was born) but my mother was from Dorchester.  They lived in St. Louis where my father was at Washington U. ( of those that did do higher ed.,  I'm the only one in my extended family, that did NOT go to Wash. U.)  But In 1941, my father was brought to MIT by its President, Karl Compton, (whose brother Arthur was President of Wash. U. -- quite a family!)  My mother, who never adjusted to the mid-west and used to come home every summer to visit her widowed mother, was thrilled.  But 1941 was a fraught time, and several MIT people were already being recruited for the expected war effort.   One of them was Vannevar Bush who would become head of the U.S. Office of Scientific Research and Development (OSRD) during the war.  (I just googled his name to get that info ---)  He had built his "dream house" in 1938 at 404 Common St.   It had a dark room, complete with gas jets, a root cellar, an incinerator, a work shop, a laundry with set tubs, a green house with watering capability -- and that was just in the basement!  The master bedroom had a walk-in closet, and its own bathroom -- with a stall shower -- all very "modern" ideas.   But by early 1941, Bush was spending so much time in Washington DC that he decided to rent it out temporarily -- just when my parents were house-hunting that summer.  They decided to take the one-year lease which had an option to buy.  We all know what happened that December (besides my 5th birthday!)  So in 1942, when it was apparent that the Bushes would not be back for the duration of the war, he sold it to my parents for $10,000.  Dad said that he put all of us through college on that as collateral for loans.  Often Bush would joke when they would meet at some scientific do, "Oh yes, you're the one who stole my house!"   It's location had been ideal when there was gas rationing all during the war, since it was only two blocks from the streetcar and there were stores for whatever you wanted (RIP Ohlin's bakery!)  My mother didn't learn to drive until 1950.  But after my brother's suicide in 1953, my mother just didn't want to live there any more -- and it had become a very large house for the shrinking family.  I told them that they could move if they wanted to, but I was not going to leave Belmont for our senior year (having begun in kindergarten in 1941) -- I'd just find someone I could room with!  Well, in 1956 they did finally move to a much smaller house (but still could accommodate two grand pianos) in Weston, where they lived much longer than their 15 years in Belmont, until my father died in 1995, having been a widower for 20 years.

One note about Common St.: it was such a barrier that I didn't know who lived on the other side from us.  Robert Yacubian said that the Forziatis lived there; news to me!  Also, Barbara Reardon lived there, (I think she was a year or two younger?), but we hardly knew each other existed.  Strange.  "Our" side of Common St. was all Chenery School.

Best --

From Robert Picariello
May 18, 2017
Joe, Bob did play clarinet in the band.

From John Keane
May 17, 2017
Hi Joe,
In 1941, with my three older sisters and mother we  left my father in North Cambridge and settled on Ash St. near Kendall playground. At four years of age I thought that the unpaved  dusty street was covered with ashes.....hence the name. A year or two later we moved to Beech St , which I assumed was named after some shore line. Later we moved a block away to Davis Rd, which conjured up nothing. Believe it or not, it was only a year ago I realized that so many streets were named after trees, and not surface conditions.
My four year old brain got updated finally.
Best,

From Harley Anderson
May 17, 2017
Thank you for all your hard work. 

I was born into a family of Swedish immigrants parents in Stockholm, Maine, a small village 20 miles north of Caribou.  One of seven children  (6).  My dad was a carpenter and WWI veteran.  He was hired to begin a new job at the Boston Navy Yard on December 6, 1941.   We moved to Brighton in the Oak Square section of all Irish Catholics.  I was five and restricted to bed with rheumatic fever for over six months.  According to the siblings they were all treated as dirty protestants and had stones tossed at them as well as the disparaging taunts each day to and from school.  When I was able to go to school I was placed in a catholic parochial school as there was a shortage of spaces in the public school and they wanted me to be in kindergarten although I had completed the first grade in Maine.   Mom had it with the city of Boston had them provide a seat in the public school and then  move us to Belmont where my parents stayed until 1967 when they retired back to Stockholm, Maine.

From Rob Yacubian
May 15, 2017

I liked Bob; he was a gentle soul.

Did he play the clarinet at BHS?
(I believe he did — JM)

From Marion (Schmitt) Ellis
May 14, (May 17), 2017
Hi Joe -- this is another thread of emails/chat that I'm just getting to respond to.  I was so intrigued about the names of Belmont streets that I've ordered a copy of the book!  It awaits me at our Cambridge address.  I too only listened to the talk part way -- it is very long, but interesting.   (I have a stack of long-ish videos that's I've found I can listen to while cleaning the kitchen, etc., so it goes on that pile! ) I'd say kudos to the Belmont Historical Society for digitalizing the 1996 talk!   My street has such a common name, i.e., Common Street(!) but I'm still intrigued to find out how and when it was named. In addition to wondering about Waverly, I wonder about Cushing Square, that was only two blocks from my home -- as a matter of fact, old Mr. Winter, of Winter's Hardware, used to call my brother Robert, who as a teen worked at many places around there, "the Mayor of Cushing Square."

Anyway, I am reminded of this: good friends who have lived in Cambridge for over 50 years told us that they have a goal of walking every street in Cambridge.  They obtained a street map of Cambridge and highlight each street after they have walked it.  That just seemed like such a good idea to me -- and good exercise (!); if I still lived in Belmont rather than most of the time in NH, it seems to me it would be a great project.  (Up here in rather rural NH, there are few "streets" and what roads there are may be many miles long ---)

Best --

From Marion (Scmitt) Ellis
May 14, (May 17), 2015
Hi Joe -- as you know, I've been out of commission as far as BHS news has been for several weeks -- so I'm just now seeing this really scary report of your lightning hit.  This is the story it prompts for me:  

A few years ago there was a direct hit on our church.  Our minister was in her office working on her computer when it happened.  It still is not known whether the hit she suffered came through the computer or was more general (thus as a result, I think it's not a bad idea to stay away from phones and computers when there is a lightning storm -- yet this one for her had no warning --).  Then, after being released from the ER, although she had not suffered any serious burns, she had memory problems for several weeks thereafter.  (Now, a few years later,  she is completely recovered.)  But, sensitized by this event, I watched an old PBS program that I just happened on about lightning.  It was excellent -- addressing many myths about it; but I was particularly impressed by the section on people who have been hit twice (extremely rare.)  One woman who had been hit suffered debilitating arthritis-like symptoms.  A year or so later, she was hit a second time -- but when she came to, she realized that all of those symptoms from the first hit were gone!  Her doctor's guess was that the adhesions from the first hit were somehow destroyed by the second, but he said "Although 'miracle' is a category that physicians do not usually use, in this case, it seems to be a plausible explanation."

Your event was more than a month ago now, so I hope that piece, at least, is only a distant memory by now.  You didn't say anything about trying to do cleanup with a recovering wrist, so I certainly hope it didn't set you back.  With our weather everywhere becoming more extreme, who knows what's next.  

More in another email -- best,

From Rod McElroy
May 15, 2017
How my folks got to Belmont:  Mom and dad lived on Craigie Street off Concord Ave in Cambridge fairly close to Harvard Square (Dad called it "Crazy Street just off Nuthouse Ave") when they first got married.  Bought their home ("built by Mr. Pelican" according to my dad) in 1931; on Douglas Road in the backyard of Mary Lee Burbank elementary school (The school faced School Street!); remained there close to 50 years until mom went to a retirement community – the Elizabeth Carlton House in Jamaica Plain which later moved to Bedford. 

From Mona (McLellan) Calthorpe
May 15, 2017
Hi Joe & Fellow Classmates:

It's been a while since I have signed on but the note about how we ended up in Belmont caught my eye. I had Two uncles who arrived n Belmont from Nova Scotia in the early 1920's- Owen Douglas Mc Lellan who lived on Trapelo Rd. Next to Brown's funeral Home  and Le Roy McLellan who lived on Worcester St. in Belmont . Both were builders and built a lot of homes in the Winnbrook section of Belmont. They sponsored my dad to come from Nova Scotia & he was a banker in Boston for the Franklin Savings Bank in Park Sq.(later sold to the Playboy Club) haha! O. D. McLellan (as he was always called) later became a State Representative.  We are related to the Marshes. One of the Marshes married a McLellan & that Al Marsh was a brother to Red Marsh & another Marsh who lived on Slade St. next to Eddie & Dick Betts and that Marsh was  A Belmont policeman. The elder Betty's worked for the town of a Belmont. Oh the tangled web we weave!!!

We are getting warm in Fl. High 70's which I love!!

Regards to all,

From Marion (Schmitt) Ellis
May 14, 2017
Hi Joe -- I just had a very nice telephone chat with Evelyn Erickson Gordon.  It was OK with her for me to pass on her news.  

As you well know, she asked that her email address be deleted from our information list because she is "simplifying".  This is what I learned about that:  Sadly, her husband passed away from esophageal cancer last September; she is consoled somewhat that this happened not long after diagnosis, but I'm sure the adjustments are never easy.  He had been the computer person in the family, so she just will find it easier not to try to handle it herself -- I'm sure many who have encountered computer troubles can relate!  She is planning to move to a place that will simplify her life even more -- e.g., no more snow removal to deal with!  But she hasn't settled yet on a place.  She wants to stay in Salem, NH, so I'm sure if anyone has any tips about over-50 places there, she would enjoy a call.  She has a daughter nearby who helps.  She herself is in good health but uses a cane and so, like most of us, is feeling the slow-down.  I reminded her that in her new place, they might have a computer facility where they can help her keep up with the Chat -- but not sure I convinced her!  She clearly enjoyed my call, and I'm sure would be happy to hear from anyone else!

In addition, I just had a nice call with Susan Parsons Cramer who had let us know about her recent move.  It was a chore for her to downsize, but she sounds very happy that it has been accomplished -- and hopes her children appreciate that she didn't leave it for them to do.  (I think I hear lots of "amen"s to that! ) Her email and phone remain as they were, so it is somewhat easier to stay in touch.  But I want to emphasize, assuming I can also speak for you about this as well as for myself, that it means a great deal to us for these two to let us know about the changes in their information.  [ -- hint to all others!!]

And just so everyone is reminded, the class information list, with street addresses, phone #s, and email addresses, was mailed to everyone at the time of our last reunion (last year!).  Of course I hope that people know where they put their list, and that they will make the changes that you have emailed.  But if they want another list, they should let you know; you will let me know; and I will send out another one.
Best...

From Marvin Zonis
May 8, 2017
I was touched to see the note from John Havice. John and his parents were my next door neighbors on Goden Street when my family moved to Belmont (in a burst of social mobility) in 1946….We became fast friends and he very graciously came to my other’s funeral in 2006! It was a delight to see him and Ron Clark who lived across the street and graduated in 1953, I think. John’s parents were the model of good people.

From Steve Wasby
May 6, 2017
It is an indication of change that Lexington and Concord were (thought to be) “ out in the country” when we were growing up – that was a real Sunday drive to go see the Battle Green and the bridge across the Charles in Concord.  Now both towns are simply part of “exurbia” – hell, there is commuter rail service now all the way to WORCESTER.

From Gerry (Turner) Cummings
May 6, 2017
I have lived in Belmont all my 81 years and I will be 82 in September; and I will never leave Belmont because I will be buried in Belmont when I die and it will be at Belmont Cemetery

From Rob Yacubian
May 5, 2017
.My parents were married in 1923 and rented a new two-family on Vincent Ave. In 1925 they bought a new house on Orchard St. as it was being completed. It was sold in 1982 after mother's passing. (I was born in that house which makes me a true Belmontian)

From John Keane
May 5, 2017
Thanks to to John Havice, Janet and you Joe ,for the interesting input about the town history. Related to this ,my father who grew up in North Cambridge, said that Arlington was originally Cambridge, and that cattle would be driven from Concord , down Mass Ave, through Harvard Square, over the Charles to the Allston slaughter houses. The cattle men stayed at a wooden hotel in Porter Square, called the "Porter House", where the best meal was .....the Porter House Steak.

My Best to all.

From John Havice
May 4, 2017
Hi Joe,

Please let Janet Miller know that my quotes came from page 18 of the 1974 edition of Richard Betts' book, "The Streets of Belmont and How They Were Named".

In the late 1930s my parents also lived in an apartment on School Street. In 1942, they bought their home on Goden Street where they lived until their deaths in the 1980s.

Best wishes,

From Harley Anderson
May 4, 2017
Thanks Joe,
Dick Betts was both a client and a friend.  His book covers most of the topics so far.  His book, Footsteps Through BELMONT is a great read for the inquisitive mind.  He gave my wife Carole and me a copy a number of years ago.  The Waverley question is covered  well on page 126 where he references a Watertown land development company named the Waverley Company purchased a large parcel of land for City folks to come to the wilds of rural America.  This same type of practice was taking place in Lexington at the same time as in Waverley, and this was the first center of commerce in the area and 4 years before Belmont `was organized as a town, so land could be sold in 20,000 to 30,000 square foot lot.  In most cases the land was subdivided in to much smaller lots and houses built  on 4,000 to 6,000 foot lots.  In Lexington they had 20 foot wide lots for tents and train rides to station along the way.  Lexington actually include a small zoo and amusements.  The experiment failed after the automobile allowed everyone to survey the wilds of Waverley.
(
Thanks for the heads-up on Waverley. It would appear that Waverley acquired its name from the company who purchased that parcel of land. Amazing how much one can learn by ‘hanging around' for a few extra years… :-)  - JM))

 

I have only one copy of his book and it is personalized or I would send it along

 

By the way John Havice was one of my friends from JR HIGH.  Please say hello.  His thought of how we came to Belmont is very interesting as well.  I will answer that later 

From Steve Wasby
May 4, 2017
Why in Belmont?
                My parents, after their marriage, lived in an apartment in Cambridge and then moved to Belmont, to a house on Pleasant St., which, had they stayed there, would have put me in Winn Brook.  Shortly before my brother was born, they moved to Pequossette Rd., where I lived through high school. At first they rented, but at the end of the war, the landlord, who had moved away, made noises about selling the house. So, after what I guess must have been some panic, they bought it . . . and remained.

                A story perhaps of some interest, particularly for those who know something about restrictive covenants and who might remember Gregory Peck in Gentleman’s Agreement: My mother, in looking for homes (before it was settled that they would stay at 35 PQ), was told by a number of realtors, “I’m glad you told us you were Jewish, Mrs. Wasby, because there are houses we cannot show you.”  Lovely, ain’t it?!

From Janet (Miller) McKee
May 1, 2017
Hello Joe - glad if I stirred up some responses on the website.  Re the Betts book - I can't find the page John Havice referred to on land allocation - can you help me John?
Meanwhile I got to wondering how many of our classmates know how their parents happened to be living in Belmont at their particular address.  In my case (and this is what prompted my School Street question), my father and his wife (the one who preceded my mother) lived in an apartment on School Street near the Watertown line.  They moved to Old Middlesex Road in 1926 - the house was newly built.  And that's where I grew up.  (My father grew up in Ohio but he worked for a company on the East Coast and that's how he came to manage their Boston office and live first in Cambridge and then Belmont.)

From Rob Yacubian
May 1, 2017
Richard Betts' talk was fascinating although I didn't hear all of it. 

From Nancy (O’Neil) Eckstein
April 28, 2017
Since I walked School St. every day to BHS, Janet’s question about School St. raised my curiosity. I always thought that the street was named School St. because of the location of the high school.  My brother disagrees - stating that the official address was Orchard St.  I found the Belmont Historical Society website (belmonthistoricalsociety.org) and a note there indicating that a book, “The Streets of Belmont and How They Were Named” by Richard Betts (which had been out of print but revised in 2014) is available.  The website also indicates that you may send questions via e-mail to BelmontHistory1859@gmail.com.  Good luck, Janet.  Let me know what you find out.

From John Havice
April 28, 2016

Hi Joe,
In response to Janet Miller's inquiry about the naming of School Street I would recommend looking at the book "The Streets of Belmont and How They Were Named".  The book was written by Richard B. Betts and published by the Belmont Historical Society in 1974. I am certain that there must be a copy in the Belmont Public Library.

The following quotes are taken from the above book. "The Original Allotments' of land in Watertown' calls this 'Hill Street, now School Street." "The 1859 map of Belmont shows a 'school building' on the east side of School Street about where Fairview Avenue is today". "This former Watertown schoolhouse stood for many years according to early records on the south side of Belmont Street on School Street". Possibly " the old Watertown street took its name from 'the street to the school". "This building was moved in 1860 to a new site on Grove Street and was used as a Belmont grade school until 1880, when it was sold to Cambridge and again moved".

Obviously not a definitive answer but perhaps the information may be of some interest.

My best regards to you and the other members of the BHS Class of 54,

From Harley Anderson
April 27, 2016
School Street crosses Belmont Street into Watertown where there are schools on that street, so maybe it is just the same continuing path that from Belmont High School to Arsenal Street in Watertown

From Joe Mazzei
April 27, 2017
These days we have date differentials regarding Patriots Day; this wasn’t the case until about 15 years after we graduated.

Kathleen wished us Happy Patriots Day on April 17, which is the day that Massachusetts declared to celebrate Patriots Day this year, (I think if Roger Goodell had his way, all ‘Patriots' and their fans would be divested of any celebrations :-) ).

Steve has pointed out that the official Patriots Day celebration has always been on the 19th, and then came the Monday long holiday weekend version.

Kathleen quotes part of Longfellow’s poem about Paul Revere; there we have the 18th of April noted by Longfellow.

I believe Kathleen, Steve and Longfellow have valid views. Although Longfellow chooses to glorify one patriot

According to Massachusetts' laws, Patriots Day is now celebrated on the 3rd Monday in April. So Patriots Day celebrations  have a chance of being celebrated on the 19th, if it’s a 3rd Monday. 3rd Mondays can fall from the 15th to the 21st, (let’s not forget Leap Year). This year it was celebrated on the 17th. Longfellow implies that things began on the 18th with Paul Revere’s ride to warn the farmers and colonists.

Let’s say that Longfellow was correct with his timing. Revere was watching for the lantern(s) at the Old North Church, perhaps a couple of hours before midnight, (on April 18). But, Longfellow as he writes of Revere’s gallant ride, omits William Dawes and Dr. Samuel Prescott. Take a look at this link:
http://www.history.com/news/the-midnight-ride-of-william-dawes for the other side of the story, and why the most significant date for Patriots Day is/was April 19th.

From Steve Wasby
April 27, 2017

Patriots Day may have been celebrated on April 17 this year, but that is only because it has now, after many years, become a “Monday holiday” (like almost every other holiday).  However, the standard legal holiday in Massachusetts long was April 19, which was also the opening day of the then-shorter baseball season, and it was always the Yankees v. the Red Sox.

From Janet (Miller) McKee
April 25, 2017
Hello Joe - I'm looking for some information about the history of Belmont.  Does anyone know how School Street got its name.  What was the school and when and where?

All the best...

p.s. a message for Anne Freeman Mayo - I just finished reading Alexander Hamilton.  A wonderful book.  She was reading it at the time of our reunion and recommended it.

From Kathleen (Hennesy) Stoll
April 17, 2017
Here's a favorite we’ve probably forgotten...

Listen, my children, and you shall hear of the midnight ride of Paul Revere,

On the eighteenth of April, in Seventy-Five: Hardly a man is now alive

Who remembers that famous day and year, And the midnight ride of Paul Revere.

HAPPY PATRIOT'S DAY!

From Rob Yacubian
April 14-15, 2017
John Keane:  your painting is magnificent. It's so happy.

Easter greetings to you, too.
Heading back to Boston and Greenfield after  wonderful winter weather in Boca Raton.

Then I'll start 4-day weekends at my sister's in Cotuit. (Missed your giving the sign in address.)

From John Keane
April 13, 2017
Hi Joe,
Here's wishing you and our classmates a Good Passover and Happy Easter.
Enjoy the new air of Spring.
Cheers,


Early Spring - 11X14” Oil - by John Keane

From Ann (Freeman) Mayo
April 10, 2017
Dear Joe,
I wanted to share with you a similar lightning night. In the 1990's a lightning storm stalled near our house, with continuous strikes near us for several minutes. While we were cowering in the dining room, a bolt struck a tall old hemlock tree near the house. It simply exploded, sending shards 75 feet in every direction. The next day you could smell that the sap had come to a boil. Another bolt struck a shag-bark hickory tree about 15 feet from the house, and drilled a hole 6" across into the ground at the foot of the tree. That tree survived. Hope never to experience that again.

Thanks for reminding me that nothing gets in the way of natural forces.

From John Keane
April 7, 2016
Holy mackerel Joe and Nancy........talk about a night from Hell. That must have been a high anxiety period of time , not knowing what to expect next. You must have been in the Eye of the storm I would think. Glad you folks were not physically injured.

Thanks so much for your skills in putting my website on our Class site.

Best Wishes,

From Fred Merk
April 7, 2016
Hello Joe and Nancy,
 Yes indeed!
  I guess we all can agree it's fortunate that neither You, Nancy or the Dog were hurt by the strike and that there was no fire!!
  My only news is that Elizabeth & I are downsizing and will be moving in the near future,
  All my life I have been a pack rat. Now at 81 it's time for this sentimental 'thing keeper' to unload lots of 'treasures' and keep the Melrose Sanitary Dept busy.
 This is not a trash barrel story. We are already filling our third dumpster.
 I do not want my sons John and Dan to be burdened with this chore after I am gone!

  My Best to you Both and BHS '54,

From John Keane
April 4, 2017
Hi Joe,
I Hope your therapy is moving along into Spring nicely. Even the Sox have started !
On another subject, here's a little info.
A friend from my old college days ( when they called me " Jack" ) created this web site for me as a gesture of friendship. So,I 'm passing it along for our Chat 54 classmates. 
http://www.jackpaint.com

From Kathleen (Hennesy) Stoll
April 2, 2017
 The Australian video reminded me of the old story "The dog ate my homework!" Now the dog would have to eat a back pack full of stuff and a computer! Not surprising that parents have become more innovative, and teachers lose patience!

From Carolyn (Whitford) Scott
April2, 2017
April Fool's Day brought us 10-12 "  of new snow!  Happy Spring, everyone! As Jack says, "The snow will be gone in July!"

From John Keane
April 1, 2017
Joe, Thanks to Harley for the beautiful and peaceful trip to Ireland.

Great......my daughter ,a teachers aid, can't wait to share it with her comrades. (the video from Australia).

From Harley Anderson
March 31, 2017
Thanks Joe,
I loved the Australian video.  I think Bill O’Rielly has a new book out about the old school days I tend to agree with the creator of the message.   Snowing again.

(Harley is referring to the following: https://www.youtube.com/embed/Pwghabw4N80?rel=0 which was included in an earlier email.)

From Nancy (O’Neil) Eckstein
March 31, 2017
Hi Joe,  Just thinking it would be fun to share this photo of me and our Professor Steve Wasby who graciously volunteered to speak at the Mashpee Men’s Club on March 7th.  His topic, “The Supreme Court after Scalia”, was amended to include more of the happenings in the wake of the nomination of Judge Gorsuch.  Steve was very well received by approximately 40 men (and me) of varying political persuasions.  He is truly an amazing speaker. I’m proud to say he is a favorite k-12 classmate!

After the meeting Bill and I were fortunate to spend more time with Steve over lunch at a restaurant in Mashpee Commons (where this photo was taken).  Thanks again, Steve, for a great day!  The club members would love to have you back again.

From Susan (Parsons) Cramer
March 23, 2017
Hi Joe -
I am writing to report that I am moving on March 31 to … (see her new address information in the email sent on March 31, 2017) ...   E-mail and phone are unchanged.

My health is excellent, probably better than it was before I had a heart attack 18 months ago, but living alone at my age has its drawbacks.  I am looking forward to all the activities and companionship that a retirement facility affords.

The downsizing involved in selling my condo and moving to a smaller apartment is a daunting task, but I think it is going well.  I’m glad I decided to do this before there was any emergency.  The condo sold on the first day it was listed, which helps a lot.

From Kathleen (Hennesy) Stoll
March 21, 2017
Joe--Thanks so much for sharing the video and the article...A great way to start the day! Kathleen.

From Harley Anderson
March 18, 2017

http://www.andiesisle.com/an.irish.blessing.html

From Marvin Zonis
March 12, 2017
Exciting that Steve Wasby’s expertise is still being recognized.

From John Keane to Steve  Wasby
March 10, 2017

Wow, you are amazing. It took a spacecraft to locate the right guy to talk to ! The cats must be complicit.    These current conditions must give you interesting days  and challenging thought processes.

Hope it's ok for me to include Joe. The " folks" may be interested.
(John Keane told us about an experience Steve Wasby had, and then Steve wrote the following… — JM)

From Steve Wasby
March 10, 2017
  I awoke this morning, turned on my e-mail (at 6am), and found a message that had arrived in the wee hours, asking me to be interviewed by Radio Sputnik (I am not making this up)  about the challenges by state attorneys general to the new Executive Order travel ban.

They were quite professional:  they sent me the questions (one of which I said I’d not answer as I wasn’t sufficiently versed in the matter), they notified my University’s Media Service that they had contacted me; and the interviewer (a guy with a Brit accent) stuck to the questions – no tricks, no games.  Was on air for 6-7 minutes, which is good time for radio.  The producer said she had found my name in another article (probably as I was recently quoted on Bloomberg News on the same subject) and then checked out my profile on my University website.

I’m still shaking my head in disbelief.

From Harley Anderson
March 6, 2017
I remember Conrad.  His brother just died a week ago or so.  His father was a Doctor.  He played football as a big heavy kid in Junior high and then went away to prep school I believe.

From Rob Yacubian
March 6, 2017
1. I don't remember a Miss Rose at Kendall. What grade was she? (2nd—JM)

2. Arthur Forziati was not born in '93.  (apparently not ‘93… obit shows ‘39. Maybe fingers flying too fast on keyboard ? — JM). He was a few years younger us. Then younger than Arthur was sister, Amy. There is no other brother. Only Conrad, Arthur, and Amy., (Obit indicates 2 brothers Carl and Conrad. Never knew Carl, either born much later or adopted? Obit indicates Amy predeceased Arthur. — JM)

3. They lived across the street (Common) from Marion Schmidt where their father, Dr. Alfonse, had his office .Playing in their back yard I was introduced to their bocci court.

From Steve Wasby
February 24, 2017
You’ll remember that, some time back I wrote about talking to the nephew of Conrad Forziati, who was in school with us at least through junior high but did not graduate with us.

 This morning’s CAPE COD TIMES has the obituary of Arthur L. Forziati, b. 1-20-93, graduate of Belmont HILL. He leaves two brothers, one of whom is “our” Conrad.
(I think it was 2nd grade at the Kendall School when Conrad came on the scene. I do remember that his father (Dr. Forziati) brought him to our classroom (Miss Rose’s). Today, this strikes me as somewhat strange. I tend to think that the principal (Mr. Robinson) would have done that. Anyway... here’s yet another memory. Perhaps Rob Yacubian - or another ‘Kendallite' - can check in with other memories… JM)

Take care,

From Kathleen (Hennesy) Stoll
February 11, 2017

Myron has been writing a book about our "retirement", working in Ukraine.
It is now on Amazon. 
https://www.amazon.com/Ukraine-Starting-Wireless-Business-Cleveland/dp/1541265513

 It is a good eye into the history and the current status of Ukraine and the challenges they face in Ukraine today.

From Steve Wasby
February 11, 2017
Joe – It’s good you aren’t here, because with your disabled arm, you wouldn’t be able to do anything about the snow.

The Thursday night storm (snow ended around midnight), while less here than anticipated (probably 7-8”) still left me plowed in (by the Town) until my guy came and “released” me at 9:05 am.  But other places got REALLY walloped – Plymouth, over a foot.

 Then three inches last night, but light powder and easy to remove. And more is expected for Monday, although the Cape (and areas south of Boston) will get mostly rain.

Hope you are well and coping with the wrongly-pointed hand.

 

From Kathleen (Hennesy) Stoll
February 9, 2017

Not only did she expose us to lectures, but taught us how to take notes! I am forever grateful to her for teaching us that skill--I have used it all my life!

Don't forget to massage  your fingers!  (Will do… trying to get them to look more like fingers than undersized egg rolls :-) - JM)

From Steve Wasby
February 7, 2017
Something brought back what Mrs. Hornsey had taught us.

As I remember it, for one unit of the course, she treated it as straight lecture, to prepare us for the lecture style we would face in college.

And it was extremely valuable preparation.
What brought it back was that I talked to an AP Government class (at Monomoy High School – that’s Harwich/Chatham)  about the structure of the courts.  The feedback was positive but I am told the students had a little difficulty getting adjusted to me at first, (no smart remarks out there, please!) – and it was because I was lecturing, which the teacher (who is terrific) doesn’t often do.

We do tell them that “this is more like what you’ll encounter in college,” but it’s still a “cold bath” when you are first exposed to it. 

From Joanne (Vernon) Andrellos
January 18, 2017
Hi Joe and Nancy,
Just thought you would like to know that the charming Fred Merk and his lovely wife, Elizabeth, spent this afternoon with me, reminiscing and very much enjoying each other’s company.

What a memorable day, seeing Elizabeth, my friend for over 20 years, who married Fred almost three years ago, unbeknown to me.  And after her ordeal with her back surgery and many falls, it was great to see how  she has improved and is no longer falling.  It  was so much fun to be with them and recall so much of each of our lives.  A very special day, indeed.
My best to you both,
(
Thanks Joanne. For our classmates' information, Joanne and Elizabeth became friends long before Fred had met Elizabeth. So, on one hand we’ve heard about Elizabeth’s remarkable healing experience from Fred; now we learn that  yet another BHS classmate - Joanne - also is Elizabeth’s friend, and is pleased with her healing… JM)

From Harley Anderson
January 18, 2017
We received another Patch article from Harley Anderson regarding our home town. Click here - http://patch.com/massachusetts/belmont/icymi-belmont-among-americas-safest-cities-2017 to view the latest. Our thanks to Harley

 

From John Keane
January 16, 2017
Paul, that must have been a gem of an account !  ....producing so many print pieces over the years for such a prestigious  national event in DC , as the Blue Ribbon Awards.
I'm sure your other customers were impressed to know that, and to see samples of the actual works.
Thanks for your kind thoughts on my paintings. In my wanderings around, if I see something that moves me inside, I enjoy trying to paint it, usually from my photos. I felt that the this barn was like an old acquaintance that had lived an honorable life ,weathered many a storm ,and was not to be forgotten. I think that Robert Frost would have liked visiting the sight.
Hope you and Marion are enjoying your new home and it's environment.
My Best,

From Paul Lucy
January  16, 2017
Joe, interesting how this word came at us simultaneously from two different directions. John Keane's painting "Last Patch...." is first rate as always. What continues to impress me in addition to the beauty of John's work is his choice of subject matter. Diverse but most interesting. Regarding the Patch article on the selection of Butler School as a National Blue Ribbon School:  In my past life as Owner and general manager of Southport Printing in Portsmouth, my company was involved over several years in printing the broad range of materials for the annual Blue Ribbon Awards ceremony in DC. Schools selected are the result of completion among all school districts throughout the US. So I know this to be a really big deal. Congratulations to Butler and the Belmont School Department.

From Harley Anderson
January 16, 2017

Thanks Joe.  We should promote our own or Belmont's own JOHN NORMAN ROCKWELL KEANE  The picture of him painting is also great.  Thanks Fred. 

I am currently getting pulmonary therapy and the word there is  '' Pace not Race " which is good as a strategy for us aging folks.  Notice I did not say old.  Take care and be thankful for all we can enjoy.

From John Keane
January 15, 2017
Hi Joe,
I'm sure your dedication will bring excellent therapy results after your wrist surgery.

Sorry you have to go through it all. Maybe Nancy could update us of your progress ?

The attached series of "50's "photos ,in video form , might be fun for our classmates if you felt like forwarding the http along to the site.
https://safeshare.tv/x/FEDEwZHZXu

Best wishes,

From John Keane
January 15, 2017

Hi Joe,
I discovered this abandoned barn complex in Medway last Spring and started painting, but only considered it "finished " last night, after revising it every couple of months (even though it had already been framed ). Perhaps some classmates who are awaiting the end of Winter will be reminded that Spring will definitely arrive,.....and your wrist will be back to normal !
Best to all,




“Last Patch of Spring Snow”
(18 X 24 - Oil)

From Harley Anderson
January 13, 2017
(Harley sent me a copy of The Patch which has an article about the Butler School which has received Massachusetts recognition.—JM)
http://patch.com/massachusetts/belmont/belmont-elementary-school-recognized-high-academic-achievement

From Maryjayne Kolouch
January 3, 2017

You are doing a SUPER job.  I for one enjoy hearing all about Bob’s Class mates.

From Fred Merk
January 2, 2017
Hello Joe and Nancy,
 Glad you are home after a fulfilling Christmas Holiday with family.
 Regarding the lost input to 'Chat' 2014 and part of 2015...perhaps information from classmates during that time can be sent to you again and be useful for reconstruction.
I am sure classmates can check their 'Sent' files to see what was e-Mailed to you during that time.
 During the " lost time " I sent you a photo of  John Keane in midst of the environment he loves. Here it is again with an example of our Class Artist's phenomenal Work!
 The latest turn on Elizabeth's spinal surgery story :
 Joanne Andrellos sent me a very nice e-Mail in response to your recent post... expressing relief that "my" Elizabeth was doing so well.
 It turns out that "my" Elizabeth is also Joanne's!  They have known each other for years....long before I came on the scene....Small World!
 Joanne, Elizabeth and I are planning a lunch in Lexington soon to catch up on news and review old times.
 All the Best to you Both  and....
.... Happiness to you and our '54 Classmates in the New Year,

Reunion Committee Reminder
From Marion (Schmitt) Ellis
December 22, 2016
Hi Joe -- my apologies in being so out-of-it regarding reporting to the class about our Celebration.  As soon as it was over, politics took over, with the election only four weeks later.  We live mostly in NH where elections become everyone’s occupation.  When that was over (? -- it remains to be seen how everything will shake out!), we were on our way to Phoenix for meetings; then Thanksgiving; then our church fair; and now Christmas with decorating, baking, many grandkid concerts, etc. etc.  So in general, it’s been easy to put off the email I promised.  And actually, there isn’t a lot to say.  The good news is that those of us who were there on October 3 had another great time.  Also that we were able not only to cover all of our expenses, but also we could make a nice contribution to you for your favorite charity, as we have in other years, and also to the Belmont Food Pantry, as we did the last time.  

The sad news is that the committee has decided we will not carry on as a formal committee.  This means that from here on, any get-togethers will be self-starters.  It also means that we did not keep any of the funds as seed money for the next reunion as we have before, (thus the contribution to the Food Pantry;) any future informal reunions will have to self-fund.  But because of your terrific contribution to keeping us together, the news of informal reunions will easily be distributed, at least to those who have email, and details about funding will also be able to be distributed on the Chat.  Thanks in advance!  So we hope people will use the Chat and the address list that has been distributed to everyone to keep on getting together; we are an interesting bunch!

In that regard, there is very good news:  Bea Capraro Busa has already moved to bring us together next summer.  She plans to reserve a dining room at her golf club in Lexington on a Monday (when it is normally closed) next summer.  Currently she is looking at the last Monday in July.  Further details will come out closer to the time, but feel free to contact her if you are interested.  Some of you who live a distance away might plan to make a trip then.

However, even though as I write this the sun has just begun to be with us a little longer each day, with snow on the ground and some bitter cold temperatures, it is hard to imagine summer.  So let me just wish all many joys at this time of year and into the next!

Warmly, Marion

PS -- another reminder to email you if there is an address change; or phone me at 617-494-1123.

(Re the “favorite charity”, many may know by now of the devastation caused by Hurricane Matthew’s flooding in southeastern NC. Our church adopted a ‘sister church' in Lumberton, NC. So, the contribution to me went to a pastor’s discretionary fund in Lumberton, NC. This added to the funds he was able to distribute to those needing clothing, shelter, and food. On behalf of those victims, “Thank you “ - JM)

Happy New Year --- 2017

07/06/17

 

Chat 17
7-12